Guidelines for voters

We all have a part to play in general local elections. Every vote counts, and we strongly encourage you to turn out on voting day and cast your ballot.

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General guidelines for voters

The Province of BC offers a useful guide for voters that explains the rules and requirements.

You can also find answers to commonly asked questions in the section below, which covers:

  • Voting eligibility
  • Registering to vote
  • Managing registration details and other personal information
  • Voting by mail
  • Getting help to vote

The information in this section is a simplified version of the election rules in plain language, intended for general information. For the complete, official rules for general local elections, please review Section 3 of the Local Government Act and Section 81 of the Community Charter.

Are you eligible to vote?

Voting rights are given to citizens based on residency or property ownership (although nobody is eligible to vote in relation to property owned through or in conjunction with a corporation).

There are two categories of electors for local government elections in BC: Resident Electors and Non-Resident Property Electors. 

Voting as a Resident Elector

You are eligible to register as a Resident Elector if you:

  • are at least 18 when you register to vote, or 18 on general voting day
  • are a Canadian citizen
  • have been a resident of BC for at least six months immediately before you register to vote
  • have lived in the District of North Vancouver for at least 30 days immediately before you register 
  • are not disqualified under the Local Government Act, or any other enactment, or by law from voting in a local election

View the Province of BC's Voter's Guide to Local Elections

Voting as a Non-Resident Property Elector

You are eligible to register as a Non-Resident Property Elector if you are a Canadian citizen at least 18 years old on general voting day, and you:

  • are not entitled to register as a Resident Elector of the District of North Vancouver
  • have been a BC resident for at least six months immediately before you register to vote
  • are the registered owner, or an owner as joint tenant or tenant in common, of property in the District of North Vancouver for at least 30 days immediately before you register to vote
  • are not disqualified under the Local Government Act, or any other enactment, or by law from voting in a local election

View the complete eligibility requirements for Non-resident Property Electors

Are you a student?

If you attend school in a different jurisdiction than where your residence is located, you can vote in either jurisdiction, but not both.

Do you live on a First Nations reserve?

As long as you are eligible, you can vote in the general local election.

Registering to vote

You must be registered before you can vote in the general local election.

We use the province's most recent provincial electors list as our registered resident electors list, so if you are registered to vote in the next provincial election, you're automatically registered to vote in the 2018 general local election.

Not sure if you are already registered? Check now on the Elections BC website.

How to register at the voting place when you vote

Advanced registration closed on August 28, 2018. If you still need to register to vote, you must do so in person at the time of voting. Here's how:

Residents

Bring two pieces of identification with you to establish your identity and place of residence. At least one of your pieces of ID must contain your signature. If you do not have ID that will establish your place of residence, you can make a solemn declaration when you vote.

  • Examples of ID that will establish your identity: Driver’s Licence, BC ID, MSP card, SIN card, credit card
  • Examples of ID that will establish your place of residence: Driver’s Licence, BC ID, telephone bill, hydro bill, personalized cheque

Non-resident Property Electors

You must bring two pieces of identification. At least one piece needs to have your signature and proof that you own the property (eg. deed, title search). If your property has other owners, you need to provide a consent form signed by a majority of the other owners.

Download the consent form

Managing your voter registration details and other personal information

Changing your registered name or address

To make changes to your name and address, contact Elections BC. You can visit the Elections BC website, or phone them at 1-800-661-8683.

You can also make changes at the voting place on voting day. Speak to the Alternate Presiding Election Official, who will help you fill in the correct form. Bring the required ID with you.

Removing someone who is deceased from the voters list

To remove a deceased person from the Provincial list, contact Elections BC. You can apply on the Elections BC website, or phone them at 1-800-661-8683.

A deceased person can also be removed from the voters list on voting day at the voting place. Speak to the Alternate Presiding Election Official, who will help you fill in the correct form. 

Protecting your private information

The list of registered electors can be amended to protect your privacy or security. This means your address or other personal information will be omitted or obscured when the list is made available for public inspection, or when it is provided to candidates.

To protect your information, write to the Chief Election Officer at District Hall, or email gordonja@dnv.org 

What you need to bring on voting day

If you are already registered, no identification will be required to vote. If you are not registered, have moved or changed your name, you will require two pieces of ID.

Also, unlike Federal or Provincial elections, voter cards are not mailed out for general local elections in the District of North Vancouver. You can choose to vote at any of the 20 polling stations on October 20.

Voting by mail

Mail ballot voting is intended to allow non-resident property electors, seasonal residents, people in geographically remote locations, and people whose mobility or health is compromised, an opportunity to cast their ballot in the election. 

If you are unable to vote during an advance or general voting day, you can complete a vote by mail.

To receive a mail ballot package by mail, please submit a mail ballot request form to the Clerk’s Office before September 25, 2018.

Download the Resident Elector Mail Ballot Application

Download the Non-Resident Property Elector Mail Ballot Application
If your property has other owners, you need to provide a consent form signed by a majority of the other owners. Download the consent form

Getting help to vote

If a voter has difficulty reading or writing English, or you have difficulty entering a voting place, you can request assistance.

Voters who speak other languages

Voters who speak other languages may bring a translator to assist in the voting process. The translator must complete a solemn declaration of assistance in order to provide translation assistance.

Voters with mobility or other physical challenges

If you have difficulty entering the voting place, you may ask to receive and mark your ballot at a place located outside the voting place (curbside voting).

If you require assistance with voting, you may ask the Presiding Election Official (PEO) in charge of the voting place to assist you, or bring someone with you to the voting place to help you vote.

If you bring someone with you, this person must make a solemn declaration to preserve the secrecy of your ballot, to mark the ballot according to your wishes, and to not attempt to influence your vote.

 

More questions? We're here to help

Do you still have questions about the upcoming election? Are you looking for information about District policies, priorities, and procedures to help you prepare to run for office?

Let us know, and we'll be happy to get answers for you.